Problems, behaviors, needs & tools, plus design guidelines for building accessible products

A representation of a speech bubble made out of paper
A representation of a speech bubble made out of paper
Photo by Volodymyr Hryshchenko on Unsplash

In my article “The three levels of accessibility”, I mention the importance of designing for clarity and inclusivity. Not only to ensure everybody regardless of ability is able to access your site but so that developers can implement accessible code.

I will be discussing the various problems people face, their unique behaviors and needs, the tools they use, and how we can better accommodate them in our digital products. I’ve broken it into 5 sections across 5 articles:

Speech

Speech disabilities are characterized by the inability to produce or organize speech sounds and syllables correctly or…


Problems, behaviors, needs & tools, plus design guidelines for building accessible products

A man in a wheelchair having a prosthetic lower arm fitted by a prosthetist
A man in a wheelchair having a prosthetic lower arm fitted by a prosthetist
Photo by ThisisEngineering RAEng on Unsplash

In my article “The three levels of accessibility”, I mention the importance of designing for clarity and inclusivity. Not only to ensure everybody regardless of ability is able to access your site but so that developers can implement accessible code.

I will be discussing the various problems people face, their unique behaviors and needs, the tools they use, and how we can better accommodate them in our digital products. I’ve broken it into 5 sections across 5 articles:

Physical

This category is broad and can affect any of us. Physical conditions can be both permanent and…


Problems, behaviours, needs & tools, plus design guidelines for building accessible products

A close up of a brown eye representing sight
A close up of a brown eye representing sight
Photo by salvatore ventura on Unsplash

In my article “The three levels of accessibility”, I mention the importance of designing for clarity and inclusivity. Not only to ensure everybody regardless of ability is able to access your site but so that developers can implement accessible code.

I will be discussing the various problems people face, their unique behaviours and needs, the tools they use, and how we can better accommodate them in our digital products. I’ve broken it into 5 sections across 5 articles:

Visual/Sight

Typically people think of full blindness when discussing web accessibility for the visually impaired. There are many…


Their problems, behaviours, needs & tools, plus design guidelines for building accessible products.

An ear on a white background representing audio and the ability to hear
An ear on a white background representing audio and the ability to hear
Photo by Franco Antonio Giovanella on Unsplash

In my article “The three levels of accessibility”, I mention the importance of designing for clarity and inclusivity. Not only to ensure everybody regardless of ability is able to access your site but so that developers can implement accessible code.

I will be discussing the various problems people face, their unique behaviours and needs, the tools they use, and how we can better accommodate them in our digital products. I’ve broken it into 5 sections across 5 articles:

Auditory/Hearing

When talking about users with auditory problems most of us would think of deafness and hearing loss…


Their problems, behaviours, needs & tools, plus design guidelines for building accessible products

An electrical signal within the brain and neurological system
An electrical signal within the brain and neurological system
Photo by Josh Riemer on Unsplash

In my article “The three levels of accessibility”, I mention the importance of designing for clarity and inclusivity. Not only to ensure everybody regardless of ability is able to access your site but so that developers can implement accessible code.

I will be discussing the various problems people face, their unique behaviours and needs, the tools they use, and how we can better accommodate them in our digital products. I’ve broken it into 5 sections across 5 articles:

Cognitive/Neurological

The first group includes mental, psychological, and medical problems that may cause a decreased mental function or…


Make your next interview your last by following this guide

Looking for UX interview questions you are likely to be asked? Questions you can ask the interviewer? Or how to better prepare before an interview? You’ve come to the right place!

I recently interviewed and moved into my next role after a redundancy thanks to a company restructure. I was fortunate enough that my previous employer paid for a career transition company called LLH to support me.

I want to share with you what I have learnt and help others successfully find their next role!

A pair of hands writing in a notebook on a wooden table along with a cup of coffee and a half eaten croissant
A pair of hands writing in a notebook on a wooden table along with a cup of coffee and a half eaten croissant
Photo by Cathryn Lavery on Unsplash

Pre-interview, be prepared

If there is one thing I’d want you to take away from this article it’s…


Start your next project off on the right foot by using these questions

The secret weapon in a Product Designers toolkit are questions! Especially at the beginning of a project where it is important to fully understand the challenge, the current understanding (biases), and to ensure usability is thought about on day one.

New designers often have the anxiety not to ask questions during a project kick-off meeting. I know I used to, for fear of asking the wrong question or not being senior enough. If the team is made of the right people then no question is a silly one regardless of seniority.

I’ve structured the questions into categories. Use your own…


A detailed process for UX Designers inspired by The Hero’s Journey.

The UX Designer’s Journey diagram, outlining the 4 quadrants and 12 steps, 3 steps per quadrant.
The UX Designer’s Journey diagram, outlining the 4 quadrants and 12 steps, 3 steps per quadrant.
The UX Designer’s Journey diagram, outlining the 4 quadrants & 12 steps, 3 steps per quadrant.

The UX/Product Designer role has evolved past simply designing solutions in a silo. To build the best solutions we know Designers should be involved throughout a project's lifecycle & work cross-functionally. We all know at a high level a design process looks like this: define, ideate, prototype, & test. It serves its high-level educational purpose but doesn’t include the cross-functional aspect or provide enough detail & guidance to do the actual job.

UX Designers have a lot to consider & think about at each stage. It’s important not to miss something as it will have a negative effect later on…


Level up your projects' accessibility through strategy, design, and development.

A 3D pyramid divided into 3 horizontal sections, strategy and reach, design and clarity, implementation and inclusivity
A 3D pyramid divided into 3 horizontal sections, strategy and reach, design and clarity, implementation and inclusivity
The three levels of accessibility pyramid

I was recently asked:

“What does accessibility mean to you?”

I listed off the top of my head the key points… contrast, size, screen readers, hardware, etc… etc… Suffice to say I thought about it a lot afterward…

How could I answer this better?

To help, I created something called the 3 levels of accessibility. There are 3 crucial points throughout a project where accessibility should be influenced. Each level supports the next and depending on its execution will vary in strength. …


What the problems are and how they can be solved.

A smart phone with the NHS covid test and trace application open
A smart phone with the NHS covid test and trace application open
Photo by John Cameron on Unsplash

You only need to listen to the news networks or read the reviews on both the Apple App Store and Google Play Store to hear how the UK’s covid test and trace system is struggling to live up to the reputation of World Beating System”.

“Another app built by people who don’t live or experience the real world.” — Snippet from a Google Play review

As a Digital Product Designer, I was intrigued to understand where the app and system had gone wrong. …

blayne phillips

A strategic product designer with some developer experience who is competent at all stages of the design process.

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